10 Fastest Spiders in the World

Spiders move quickly for a variety of reasons. First, their legs are specially designed for quick movement. Many spiders have long, slender legs covered in microscopic hairs known as setae. These hairs assist the spider in gripping the surface on which it is walking, allowing it to travel fast and easily.

Spiders also have a particular joint in their legs that allows them to move their legs in a circular manner, similar to how humans swing their arms while sprinting. This assists them in generating speed and acceleration.

Here are 10 of the fastest spiders in the world.

10. Jumping Spider

Speed Time: up to 0.2 miles per hour
Family: Saslticidae
Size: 0.25-0.5 inches
 Country of Origin: Worldwide
 Lifespan: 1-2 years

Jumping Spiderphoto source: exopetguides.com

Jumping spiders are a type of spider distinguished by their ability to jump vast distances. They are little spiders that normally range from 4 to 25 mm. Jumping spiders can be found all over the world, and there are over 600 different species. They have a characteristic look that includes large, forward-facing eyes and a small, hairy body.

Jumping spiders are energetic hunters who use their keen vision and agility to track down and capture prey. They do not spin webs to catch insects and other small arthropods but instead rely on their jumping skills and quick reactions.

They are particularly well-known for their stunning courtship displays, which include complicated motions and actions designed to attract a mate.

Did You Know:

Jumping spiders are generally not considered to be dangerous to humans, as they are not venomous and are not aggressive. However, they can bite if they feel threatened, so it is best to handle them gently and cautiously.


9. Zebra Spider

Speed Time: up to 0.2 miles per hour
Family: Salticus Scenicus
Size: 0.25-0.5 inches, leg span approx. 1 inch
 Country of Origin: Worldwide
 Lifespan: 1-2 years

Zebra Spiderphoto source: wikimedia.org

The Zebra spider, sometimes known as the Salticus, is a venomous spider widespread throughout Europe, Asia, and North America. It belongs to the Salticidae family and is recognized for its unique look and venomous bite.

The Zebra spider is tiny, measuring 0.25-0.5 inches in length and up to 1 inch in leg span. It gets its name from the striking white and black stripes on its abdomen, which resemble zebra stripes.

The venomous Zebra spider’s bite can be fatal to humans. The Zebra spider’s venom contains neurotoxins, which can induce symptoms such as pain, swelling, and redness at the bite site. Deaths from Zebra spider bites, on the other hand, are exceedingly rare, as timely medical intervention can help to avert major complications.

Zebra spiders are not aggressive and bite only if threatened or mistakenly handled.

Did You Know:

Zebra spiders are diurnal, meaning they are active during the day. They are often found on flowers, where they feed on insects such as flies and mosquitoes.


8. Brown Recluse Spider

Speed Time: up to 0.2 miles per hour
Family: Loxosceles reclusa
Size: 0.5-1.5 inches, leg span approx. 3 inches
 Country of Origin: United States
 Lifespan: 1-2 years

Brown Recluse Spiderphoto source: holperspest.com

The brown recluse spider is also known as the violin or fiddleback spider. It is distinguished by a characteristic violin-shaped marking on its head and back, which gives rise to its popular name. The brown recluse spider is a little spider that grows to be approximately the size of a quarter and is light to medium brown.

Brown recluse spiders are venomous and can bite people if threatened. Their venom is toxic and can result in serious harm, including necrosis (tissue death) at the bite site.

Brown recluse bites, on the other hand, are relatively uncommon, and most people recover from them with adequate medical treatment. If you feel you have been bitten by a brown recluse spider, you should seek medical assistance immediately.

Did You Know:

Brown recluse spiders are nocturnal and prefer to hide in dark, undisturbed areas such as closets, attics, and basements.


7. Hobo Spider

Speed Time: up to 0.2 miles per hour
Family: Eratigena agrestis
Size: 0.75-1.25 inches, leg span approx. 1.5-2 inches
 Country of Origin: Europe
 Lifespan: 2-4 years

Hobo Spiderphoto source: goturfco.com

Hobo spiders are medium-sized spiders with 1.5 to 2-inch leg spans. They are brown with a characteristic herringbone pattern on their abdomen. The aggressive house spider, also known as Tegenaria agrestis, is a spider species native to Europe that has been brought to the United States. It is mostly found in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States.

Hobo spiders are well-known for spinning irregular, funnel-shaped webs. They are most commonly found in damp, dark places. Hobo spider bites can cause minor symptoms such as discomfort, swelling, and redness, but they are not known to be fatal.

Did You Know:

Hobo spiders are named after the “Hobos” of the 1930s, who traveled from place to place looking for work. This is because hobo spiders are often found in temporary or makeshift habitats, such as cardboard boxes or piles of debris.


6. Redback Spider

Speed Time: up to 0.2 miles per hour
Family: Latrodectus hasseltii
Size: 0.5-1 inch, leg span approx. 2 inches
 Country of Origin: Australia
 Lifespan: 1-2 years

Redback Spiderphoto source: pestcontrolperth.info

Redback spiders are venomous spiders that are native to Australia. They are small spiders, with females reaching sizes of up to 15mm and males reaching sizes of up to 3mm. Redback spiders are known for their distinctive black and red coloration, with a red stripe on the abdomen and black legs.

They are found in various habitats, including urban areas, forests, and grasslands. Redback spiders are venomous, and their bite can cause severe pain and other symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, and muscle spasms. However, their venom is not deadly to humans, and antivenom is available.

Did You Know:

Redback spiders are part of the widow spider family and are closely related to the black widow spider of the United States. They have unique mating behavior. After the male redback spider mates with the female, he remains attached to her and continues to transfer sperm to her over several days. During this time, the male redback spider is vulnerable to predators and is often eaten by the female after mating is complete.


5. Black Widow Spider

Speed Time: up to 0.2 miles per hour
Family: Latrodectus
Size: 0.5-1.5 inches, leg span approx. 3 inches
 Country of Origin: Worldwide
 Lifespan: 1-3 years

Black Widow Spiderphoto source: newscientist.com

Black widow spiders are venomous spiders that are native to the Americas. They are known for their distinctive black coloration and the red hourglass shape on the female’s abdomen. Black widow spiders are small spiders, with females reaching sizes of up to 1.5 inches and males reaching sizes of up to 0.5 inches.

Black widow spiders are venomous, and their bite can cause severe pain. In rare cases, their bite can be fatal, especially to young children, the elderly, and those with compromised immune systems. However, antivenom is available and effective in treating black widow spider bites.

Did You Know:

Black widow spiders are named after the female’s habit of eating the male after mating. However, this behavior is not universal, and not all female black widow spiders engage in it. Bottom of Form


4. Wolf Spider

Speed Time: up to 0.2 miles per hour
Family: Lycosidae
Size: 0.5-2 inches, leg span approx. 1.5-2 inches
 Country of Origin: Worldwide
 Lifespan: 1-1.6 years

Wolf Spiderphoto source: futurecdn.net

Wolf spiders are venomous spiders that are found throughout the world. They are named for their wolf-like appearance and behavior and are known for their agile hunting techniques. Wolf spiders are medium to large, with some species reaching sizes of up to 2 inches.

Wolf spiders are venomous, but their venom is not considered dangerous to humans. Their bite may cause some pain and swelling but is not typically life-threatening.

Did You Know:

Wolf spiders are named after their habit of hunting and chasing down their prey. They are known for their speed and agility and are skilled at capturing insects, other spiders, and small rodents.


3. Yellow Sac Spider

Speed Time: up to 0.2 miles per hour
Family: Cheiracanthium
Size: 0.25-0.75 inches, leg span approx. 1.5 inches
 Country of Origin: North America
 Lifespan: 1-2 years

Yellow Sac Spiderphoto source: animalcorner.org

Yellow sac spiders are named for the yellow color of their egg sacs and are known for their long, thin legs. Yellow sac spiders are small to medium-sized spiders with a body length of up to 0.75 inches.

Yellow sac spiders are venomous, and their bite can cause mild to moderate symptoms such as pain, swelling, and redness. In rare cases, their bite may cause more severe symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, and muscle cramps.

However, yellow sac spider venom is not considered dangerous to humans, and antivenom is not typically needed for their bites.

Did You Know:

Yellow sac spiders are named after the silken sacs that they build for shelter and to protect their eggs. These sacs are usually found in hidden, sheltered locations, such as leaf litter, under rocks, or in the corners of rooms.


2. Australian Funnel-web Spider

Speed Time: up to 0.2 miles per hour
Family: Atrax robustus
Size: 2-3 inches, leg span approx. 4-5 inches
 Country of Origin: Australia
 Lifespan: 5-7 years

Australian Funnel-web Spiderphoto source: yates.com.au

The Australian funnel-web spider is a venomous spider that is native to Australia. It is known for its highly toxic venom and aggressive behavior. Australian funnel-web spiders are medium to large-sized with a leg span of up to 3 inches.

Australian funnel-web spiders are venomous, and their bite can cause severe symptoms such as difficulty breathing, muscle spasms, and convulsions. In rare cases, their bite can be fatal, especially to young children and the elderly. Antivenom is available for the treatment of Australian funnel-web spider bites.

Did You Know:

Australian funnel-web spider’s fangs are like daggers, capable of severing leather shoes and fingernails.


1. Brazilian Wandering Spider

Speed Time: up to 0.3 mph
Family: Phoneutria
Size: 4-5 inches, leg span approx. 6-8 inches
 Country of Origin: South and Central America
 Lifespan: 5-7 years

Brazilian Wandering Spiderphoto source: live.staticflickr.com

The Brazilian wandering spider, also known as the banana spider, the armed spider, and the armed spider, is a venomous spider found in South and Central America. It is the fastest spider in the world, with a speed of 0.3 mph. 

It is considered one of the most venomous spiders worldwide and has a reputation for being aggressive. Brazilian wandering spiders are large, with a leg span of up to 6-8 inches.

They live in rainforests, grasslands, and urban areas. Antivenom is available for the treatment of Brazilian wandering spider bites.

Did You Know:

Brazilian wandering spiders are considered to be the world’s deadliest spider because their venom contains a mixture of proteins and peptides that acts as a potent neurotoxin in mammals. They are the most venomous spider in the 2007 Guinness Book of World Records.

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